Newsletter – January 2013

 
In This Issue

A Life Without Mirrors?

Sleep and Sloth

Resting In Him

The Cycle of Trans-generational Sexual Abuse

Christian Meditation Research in Process: Help Needed!

Logos-Centered Pedagogy: A Christian Psychology Project

The Primary Human Problem – Part 3

Around the Web

January 2013
Greetings,

The Fall and Winter of 2012 has been a busy time for me. I have been travelling more than I would like, though I never seem to realize that it will be too much until I am in the thick of it. No doubt, the timing for this issue of the newsletter got away from me. I do hope you will forgive me, particularly in light of the attached articles. There are several short pieces worth of consideration. In some ways, this newsletter perhaps has a different feel than many recent ones. Though some of the articles are similar to those we have included in the past addressing topics of interest to Christian psychologists, there is also a call for research participants and a short meditation. Rick Sholette’s longer piece is also being carried forward in this issue.

I do hope you find the pieces in this issue of Soul & Spirit edifying. If you have questions or comments, please feel free to let me know.

Jason Kanz, Ph.D.
Marshfield Clinic
kanz.jason@marshfieldclinic.org

A Life Without Mirrors?
Scott Holman
SCP Blog moderator

Could you go a year without looking at yourself in a mirror? Kjerstin Gruys wanted to try an experiment – swear off looking at herself in a mirror for an entire year to see if it helped her have “greater self-acceptance and appreciation for her body.” The first half of this year would involve getting ready for a married life, a time typically saturated (obsessed?) with focus on one’s body. She has chronicled the journey on her blog with started in March of 2011 and ended in March 2012. […]

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Sleep and Sloth
Jason McMartin, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Theology
Rosemead School of Psychology and Talbot School of Theology
Biola University

In the previous edition of Soul & Spirit, I outlined a brief theology of sleep wherein sleep shows our dependence upon an independent God and thus gives glory to him. I also discussed how sleep might be used as a spiritual practice. However, sleep’s salutary effect on the soul appears to be at odds with the ancient tradition that identifies sloth as one of the seven deadly sins. If sloth is a vice, then there may also be a danger lurking with respect to sleep. What is the relationship of sleep to sloth? […]

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Resting In Him
Valerie Murphy, LCPC, SD, BCPCC
Foundation Counseling and Training

Isaiah 58:13-14a (NASB)
13 “If because of the sabbath, you turn your foot From doing your own pleasure on My holy day, And call the sabbath a delight, the holy day of the Lord honorable, And honor it, desisting from your own ways, From seeking your own pleasure And speaking your own word, 14 Then you will take delight in the Lord, And I will make you ride on the heights of the earth…” […]

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The Cycle of Trans-generational Sexual Abuse
Andrew Schmutzer, Ph.D.
Moody Bible Institute

There’s a longevity to sexual abuse; a grotesque relational cycle that deserves serious attention by therapist and theologian alike. This pattern is common: a child is sexually abused by a parent and it comes out in counseling that the perpetrator was also abused… maybe going back generations! To outsiders, this cycle appears counter-intuitive: if one was so wounded by their abuser, why do victims so often abuse others, including their own children? […]

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Christian Meditation Research in Process: Help Needed!
Lydia Kim
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Christian Meditation Research in Process:
Part 1

After the meditation musings in my previous Soul & Spirit contributions, it is now time for EXCITING news!! My friend, Natalie Pickering (who is finishing her Ph.D. in counseling psychology) and I (finishing my Ph.D. in pastoral theology/Christian psychology) have started a project to research the effectiveness of a distinctly Christian meditation on anxiety. After reading the content of several other types of meditation (e.g., mindfulness, progressive muscle relaxation, guided imagery), we realized how much emphasis these meditations place on people’s inner resources rather than pointing them to the Source, our God […]

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Logos-Centered Pedagogy: A Christian Psychology Project
Shannon Wolf, Ph.D.
Dallas Baptist University

Assisting graduate students to think more Christianly as they grapple with the complexities of the human condition can be challenging to say the least. A primary task of professors of Christian counseling and psychology programs is to produce a holistic approach to understanding people and their problems. In order for this to happen, a full gamut of Christian thought and experiences must be employed with the goal of developing a deeper understanding of Christ and others […]

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The Primary Human Problem – Part 3
Rick Sholette, M.Div., Th.M.
Paraclete Ministries
www.paracleteministries-rsholette.com

Ignorance

In October of 2005 jury selection began for the trial of two parents accused of manslaughter and neglect in the death of their six-month-old daughter, who prosecutors say starved because of an inadequate diet. The vegetarian parents, however, believed that they were doing what was best for their children. If it turns out the baby did die of malnutrition, this may be a striking example of seriously damaging ignorance with no obvious connection to sin […]

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Around the Web

The Puritans, as a group, have a lot to offer in terms of wedding theology and living. Richard Baxter’s voluminous Christian Directory is a perfect case in point. Justin Taylor features a post entitled “What the Puritans Can Teach Us About Counseling“, looking at a series of sermons offered by pastor Tim Keller […]

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