Newsletter – October 2013

 
In This Issue

The Barky Beagles and Transformation

Reflections on a Source of One’s Problems: Desires

Christian Psychology: On the Ground and In the Air

Double Dangers

A Brief Reflection on Neuroscience and the Soul

Around the Web

October 2013
Greetings,

I hope this autumn season finds you well. Over the past year, we have been transitioning from publishing our newsletter, Soul & Spirit, from 6 times per year to 4 times per year. I am hopeful that we can continue to deliver you a quality product where you can be edified through the writings of our gracious authors. Several individuals have continued to contribute over the years and we have had some new authors as well. This month, I have tapped a couple of people who have not previously contributed—Drs. JP Moreland and David Murray. With their permission, I have included some recent articles they have written because of their application to Christian Psychology. In addition, this issue includes articles from Matthew Elliott, Lydia Kim, and myself. It is my sincere hope that we will continue to be able to benefit from new and old authors alike who show interest in this Christian Psychology project. If you ever have thoughts, reflections, or concerns, please let us know. It is our goal to serve you.

Jason Kanz, Ph.D.
Marshfield Clinic
kanz.jason@marshfieldclinic.org

The Barky Beagles and Transformation
Matthew Elliott, Ph.D.

Our neighbor’s two dogs have been affectionately christened the Barky Beagles. My son, Jackson, knows their actual names, but I am at a loss to remember. We are thankful these dogs are neighbors down the street and not next-door. On our standard route for walking our dog, Buddy, the barking starts on the approach. By the time Buddy and I can see both of them, they have worked themselves up to a fever-pitch. It is amazing to see such small hounds capable of producing such loud decibels. Buddy ignores them, as I yell out a friendly greeting: “Hey Barky Beagles, we are your friends. Say hi to Buddy.” […]

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Reflections on a Source of One’s Problems: Desires
Lydia Kim
Assistant Professor of Christian Psychology and Counseling
Urbana Theological Seminary

I’ve done some group work with counselors who shared different opinions regarding their preferred clinical interventions. Reflecting after these discussions facilitated a next step of consideration, namely, that it is obviously important to be aware of one’s presuppositions regarding the potential source of problems as the most appropriate intervention is considered. Looking into the secular psychotherapeutic world, for example—which offers tools and strategies that could potentially be effectively used and adapted to working with Christians—it makes a difference whether one believes that cognitive content, attachments gone awry, incomplete emotional processing, or internal conflicts (just to name a few) is the fundamental issue driving an individual’s primary presenting difficulties. Christians would consider how idols of the heart, not realizing one’s full identity in Christ, not accessing Christ’s empowerment of the self, or suffering caused by sinners may be the roots of one’s psychospiritual problems. […]

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Christian Psychology: On the Ground and In the Air
Jason Kanz, Ph.D.
Marshfield Clinic
kanz.jason@marshfieldclinic.org

I recently completed the year long Centurions program through the Colson Center for Christian worldview. The Centurions program, which was started about 10 years ago by Charles Colson, is essentially a training program in Christian worldview that focuses upon both intellectual and spiritual formation. It was Colson’s desire that Christians seek to affect the culture around them whatever their sphere of influence. Colson, like Eric Johnson, deeply admired Abraham Kuyper, who was well known for saying “There is not a square inch in the whole domain of our human existence over which Christ, who is Sovereign over all, does not cry, ‘Mine!'” […]

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Double Dangers
Dr. David Murray
Professor of Old Testament and Practical Theology
Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary

No credible Christian I know of says that all instances of depression, anxiety, etc., are always mental illness and never the result of personal sin. Yet sometimes that impression is given because of language and emphasis.

Similarly, no credible Christian I know of says that all instances of depression, anxiety, etc., are caused by personal sin and are never the result of mental illness. Yet sometimes that impression is given because of language and emphasis. […]

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A Brief Reflection on Neuroscience and the Soul
J.P. Moreland, Ph.D., USC; Th.M.
Distinguished Professor of Philosophy
Talbot School of Theology
Biola University

The great Presbyterian scholar J. Gresham Machen once observed: “I think we ought to hold not only that man has a soul, but that it is important that he should know that he has a soul” (J. Gresham Machen, The Christian View of Man [New York: Macmillan, 1937], p. 159.). […]

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Around the Web

There is a new online journal entitled Second Nature that may be of interest to Christian Psychology. It deals with the topic of media ecology and addressing issues of technology as the relate to the Christian life. […]

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